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Former BBC boss joins RSC board





The Swan Wing pictured during its restoration and, inset, former BBC director-general Mark Thompson has joined the RSCs board.
The Swan Wing pictured during its restoration and, inset, former BBC director-general Mark Thompson has joined the RSCs board.

THE Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) has sold £35.1million worth of tickets over the past year, its annual report has reveal.

The theatre company has also appointed former BBC director-general Mark Thompson to its board.

The RSC has reported a huge rise in turnover, 81.3million compared to £61.8million the previous year, and almost three million tickets sold for its 2,487 performances worldwide.

The annual report also shows 33 per cent of audiences had never seen an RSC performance before, 34 per cent were aged between 16 and 44, and the number of so-called access performances was doubled with 39 captioned, 44 audio described, two relaxed, four BSL signed performances, and more than £16,000 of disability rate tickets sold.

The Australian co-production of its hugely-popular boosted turnover by almost £20million on the previous year. Over £5million people have now seen the production worldwide and it has won over 70 international awards.

Some 77 per cent of income was self-generated, with box office revenue increasing to £35.1million, trading income to £24.2million and fundraising to £3.7million. Arts Council England investment totalled £15.4million and theatre tax relief contributed £1.4million to new productions, including live screenings into cinemas and schools.

Artistic director, Gregory Doran, and executive director, Catherine Mallyon, said: “As we celebrate 400 years of Shakespeare, never has he been more relevant.

"We are proud that this year we have shared his work and influence with a wider audience than ever before, giving more people the opportunity to be connected with his words.

“We have had a successful year, buoyed by strong box office, commercial and philanthropic income, and the extraordinary phenomenon which is .

"All these factors have allowed us to invest in a broad, rich and contemporary body of work, which has drawn in new and more diverse audiences around the country and across the world.

"This has only been possible as a result of strong partnerships with artists, theatres, cultural organisations, schools, sponsors, supporters and investors who have brought their creative talents to bear on our shared mission to ensure Shakespeare is for everyone. We thank them all for their huge contribution."

At the AGM on Thursday, 17th November, Lady Susie Sainsbury of Turville CBE stood down as deputy chairman and has agreed to become Artists’ Associate.

The RSC also announced the appointment of new board members and governors.

Mark Smith, a senior partner at PricewaterhouseCoopers in Birmingham, and former BBC director-general Mark Thompson joined the RSC Board, and new governors are Sir David Bell, vice-chancellor of the University of Reading and a member of the Board of Universities UK; Anita Bhalla CBE, chair of Performances Birmingham plc (Town Hall and Symphony Hall); Professor Ruru Li, who is a senior lecturer in the Department of East Asian Studies at the University of Leeds; and Sue Stapely, who is a solicitor and independent strategic communications consultant, specialising in reputation, crisis and issues management.

The Other Place has also been revamped in a successful year for the RSC
The Other Place has also been revamped in a successful year for the RSC


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