TV celeb to host free jewellery valuations in Stratford

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Kate Bliss, right, pictured at a valuation day in Mickleton last year. Photo: Mark Williamson

TELEVISION celebrity Kate Bliss is coming to Stratford-upon-Avon to do free jewellery, silver and watch valuations at The Malt House, The Rookery, Alveston on Friday 30th November from 12.30pm to 5.30pm.

Kate has recently been immersing herself in a fabulous array of Art Deco jewels which are already consigned to auction and include a diamond and sapphire halo cluster ring with a strong geometric shape, estimate £3,000 to £4,000. There’s also a fine example of white Art Deco jewellery in the form of a 6ct emerald-cut diamond solitaire ring, estimated at £30,000 to £50,000.

Art Deco emerged in Europe, primarily Paris, around 1908 and lasted through to 1935. It reached its peak in the Roaring Twenties – a period of economic prosperity with a cultural edge, particularly in major cities like Berlin, London, New York and Paris.

It was known as the années folles – the crazy years – emphasising the era’s social, artistic and cultural dynamism. Jazz blossomed and the flapper redefined the modern look for women.

The Chrysler building in New York and some of the Big Apple’s 1920s and 30s skyscrapers are monuments to Art Deco style.

In fact, fashion, cars, movie theatres, trains, ocean liners, radios and even vacuum cleaners were influenced by Art Deco innovation.

The style emerged in Europe, primarily Paris, around 1908 and lasted through to 1935. It reached its peak in the Roaring Twenties – a period of economic prosperity with a cultural edge, particularly in major cities like Berlin, London, New York and Paris.

Inevitably, fabulous jewellery was created at this time and expert jewellery consultant Kate Bliss has been bowled over by a beautiful array of Art Deco rings, ear-rings and a pearl necklace with an Art Deco emerald and diamond clasp.

Simple geometric lines dominated along with ‘white jewellery’. Advances in technology meant platinum could be easily worked and in 1924 the world’s largest platinum deposit was found in South Africa. Platinum was fashionable and matched with diamonds, created white jewellery.

Around this time, the technology for diamond cutting improved, so jewellers were able to achieve geometric cuts. In addition, art influenced jewellery with Cubism, Futurism and the Machine Aesthetic making an impact. Jewellery was more than adornment, it was part of the artistic world.

Another major influence came courtesy of the excavation in 1922 of the tomb of Tutankhamun, the boy king who ruled Egypt. When the world saw what was hidden in his burial chamber, it had a huge impact. Egyptomania left a mark on all the major jewellery houses including Cartier.

Kate’s visit to Alveston on the 30th November includes refreshments in aid of the NSPCC. No appointment needed.